April 11, 2014 – The Science of the Alimentary Canal

Mary Roach is the author of five books, and has written for Wired, National Geographic, and the New York Times Magazine, among others. Her most recent book is Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal, which like all her books is as much about human beings as it is human bodies.

Previous books
Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers
Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife
Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void
Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex

March 28, 2014 – Teenage Psychology

On this program I have a conversation with Daniel J. Siegel, M.D., internationally acclaimed author, award-winning educator, and child psychiatrist. We’ll be talking primarily about his recent book, Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain. He is currently a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine where he also serves as a co-investigator at the Center for Culture, Brain, and Development and co-director of the Mindful Awareness Research Center. He is also the Executive Director Continue reading

March 14, 2014 – Prisons & Racialization

My guest on this program is Steve Martinot, author of The Machinery of Whiteness: Studies in the Structure of Racialization, and “The Need to Abolish the Prison System: An Ethical Indictment.” He has been a human rights activist for most of his life, as a union organizer, community organizer and anti-war organizer, including Latin America solidarity work. He has worked as a machinist and truck driver, and taught literature and cultural studies at the Univ. of Colorado and San Francisco State University.

February 28, 2014 – S. Lochlann Jain

My guest on this program is S. Lochlann Jain, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University, and author of Malignant: How Cancer Becomes Us, in which she aims to better understand American life and culture through cancer. Nearly half of all Americans will be diagnosed in their lifetimes with an invasive cancer, making it an all-too common component of American Life. And yet, despite billions of dollars having been spent in search of a cure, it remains a pervasive threat.

February 14, 2014 – Relational Being & Social Construction

Kenneth Gergen is Senior Research Professor of Psychology at Swarthmore College, and President of the Taos Institute, a non-profit organization & a community of scholars and practitioners concerned with the social processes essential for the construction of reason, knowledge, and human value. His book, Relational Being: Beyond Self and Community (winner of )several distinguished awards, challenges the idea of an individual self, isolated Continue reading

January 31, 2014 – A History of Suicide and the Philosophies Against It

Jennifer Michael Hecht is the author of the bestseller Doubt: A History, a history of religious and philosophical doubt all over the world, throughout history. Her new book is Stay: A History of Suicide and the Philosophies Against It. Hecht’s The End of the Soul: Scientific Modernity, Atheism, and Anthropology won Phi Beta Kappa’s 2004 Ralph Waldo Emerson Award “For scholarly studies that contribute significantly to interpretations of the intellectual and cultural condition of humanity.”  Her The Happiness Myth brings a historical eye to modern wisdom about how to lead a good life.

January 3, 2014 – Science & Pseudoscience & Philosophy

Massimo Pigliucci has a Doctorate in Genetics from the University of Ferrara (Italy), a Ph.D. in Evolutionary Biology from the University of Connecticut, and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Tennessee. He has done post-doctoral research in evolutionary ecology at Brown University and is currently Chair of the Philosophy Department at Lehman College and Professor of Philosophy at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His research interests include the philosophy of biology, in particular the Continue reading

December 6, 2013 – Environmental Activism

Bill McKibben is Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, and the author of more than a dozen books, including The End of Nature, Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future, Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet and most recently Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist.. He is also the founder of 350.org, the global climate campaign that has been actively involved in the fight against climate change, including taking action against the oil companies, the Keystone XL pipeline, and hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as fracking. He is also a fellow of the Continue reading

November 22, 2013 – Paleontology

I apologize to my listeners for getting this posted so late.

Richard Fortey was senior paleontologist at the Natural History Museum in London. His previous books include The Hidden Landscape: A Journey into the Geological Past, which won the Natural World Book Prize in 1993, Trilobite: Eyewitness to Evolution, which was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize and was a New York Times Best Book of the Year, and most recently Horseshoe Crabs and Velvet Worms: The Story of Animals and Plants That Time Has Left Behind.

November 8, 2013 – Buddhism with Robert Thurman

Robert Thurman is a Professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies in the Department of Religion at Columbia University, President of the Tibet House U.S., a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and promotion of Tibetan civilization, and President of the American Institute of Buddhist Studies, a non-profit affiliated with the Center for Buddhist Studies at Columbia University. He is the author of many books on Tibet, Buddhism, art, politics and culture, including The Central Philosophy of Continue reading