September 30, 2016 – Parent and Child Relationships

My guest on this program is Alison Gopnik, professor of psychology and affiliate professor of philosophy at UC Berkeley. She is an internationally recognized leader in the study of children’s learning and development. She writes the Mind and Matter Column for the Wall Street Journal, and is the author of The Philosophical Baby and a coauthor of The Scientist in the Crib. Her recent book is The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us about the Relationship between Parents and Children, in which she argues that the modern notion of parenting as a kind of avocation or Continue reading

September 16, 2016 – Inevitable Technological Forces

My returning guest on this program is Wired magazine senior maverick Kevin Kelly. Author of numerous books, and writer for such publications as The New York Times, The Economist, Science, Time, and the Wall Street Journal, his most recent book is The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces that Will Shape Our Future, in which he argues that much of what will happen in the next thirty years is inevitable, driven by technological trends that are already in motion, and that will revolutionize the way we buy, work, learn, and communicate with each other.

September 2, 2016 – Disarming the Narcissist

My guest on this program is Wendy Behary, founder and clinical director of the Cognitive Therapy Center of New Jersey and the Schema Therapy Institute of New Jersey. We’ll be talking about her book, Disarming the Narcissist: Surviving and Thriving with the Self-Absorbed, which shows how to move past a narcissist’s defenses using empathy, confrontation, and limit-setting. As former guest on this program Dr. Daniel Siegel says in the preface to the book, “For two decades, (Wendy Behary) has immersed herself in Continue reading

August 19, 2016 – Overcomplicated Technology

My returning guest on this program is scientist and researcher Samuel Arbesman, and we’ll be talking about his new book, Overcomplicated: Technology at the Limits of Comprehension, in which he grapples with the mystery and wonder of 21st century technology and how we should relate to complex technological systems.

July 22, 2016 – Being a Good Neighbor

My guest on this program is Harvard University Professor of Ethics in Politics and Government Nancy Rosenblum. Her most recent book is Good Neighbors: The Democracy of Everyday Life in America, in which she explores how our relationships with our neighbors—meeting on the street, monitoring one another, and even betraying each other—create a democracy of everyday life that is somewhat removed from the moral principles prescribed for public, and more universalized, civil society and democratic life.

July 8, 2016 – Living in the World Beyond Your Head

My guest on this program is Matthew Crawford, senior fellow at the University of Virginia’s Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture. We’ll be talking today about his book, The World Beyond Your Head: On Becoming an Individual in an Age of Distraction, which was recently released in paperback, in which he investigates the challenge of mastering one’s own mind. He argues that our current crisis of attention cannot exclusively be attributed to digital technology, but can be better understood in light of some Western cultural assumptions that are profoundly at odds with human nature.

June 24, 2016 – Ethical Life

My guest on this program is Webb Keane. He is the George Herbert Meade Collegiate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. He has written several books, and his most recent is Ethical Life: Its Natural and Social Histories, in which he argues that ethics is neither entirely culturally relative nor solely a function of human nature, but arises at the intersection of human biology and social dynamics.

June 10, 2016 – Helping Children Succeed in School

My returning guest on this program is Paul Tough. We last spoke to him in 2012 for his book, How Children Succeed, which talked about the role character traits like grit and curiosity play in children’s learning. His new book is Helping Children Succeed: What Works and Why, in which he tackles pressing questions like, “What does growing up in poverty do to children’s mental and physical development?” “How does adversity at home affect their success in the classroom, from preschool to high school?” “And what practical steps can the adults who are responsible for them—from parents and teachers to policy makers and philanthropists—take to improve their chances for a positive future?”

May 27, 2016 – American Amnesia and Prosperity

My guest on this program is Paul Pierson. He is the John Gross Professor of Political Science at the University of California at Berkeley, and co-author with Jacob Hacker of American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper.They explore how America’s prosperity has long rested on robust capitalist enterprise, supported, supplemented, and regulated by government. This “mixed economy” channeled the powerful but volatile engine of capitalism into broad-based growth and healthy social development. But the anti-government advocates have undermined this productive and necessary relationship.

May 13, 2016 – Listen, Liberal! with Thomas Frank

My guest on this program is Thomas Frank, author of numerous books, including The Wrecking Crew, What’s the Matter with Kansas? and Pity the Billionaire about which he appeared on this program in September of 2012. He is the founding editor of The Baffler, and has written for other publications. He joins us today to talk about his new book, Listen, Liberal – or – What Ever Happened to the Party of the People?