July 18, 2014 – The Island of Knowledge

This program features a conversation with Marcelo Gleiser, the Appleton Professor of Natural Philosophy and Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Dartmouth College. He is the author of four books, most recently The Island of Knowledge: The Limits of Science and the Search for Meaning. This book addresses such questions as, “Do all questions Continue reading

June 20, 2014 – A Case of Identity

On this program, we talk with Jennifer Ouellette, science writer and author most recently of Me, Myself, and Why: Searching for the Science of Self. She draws on cutting-edge research in genetics, neuroscience, and psychology to explore the mysteries of human identity and behavior.

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June 6, 2014 – How Jesus Became God

This program features a conversation with one of the most renowned and controversial Bible scholars in the world, Bart D. Erhman, about his most recent book, How Jesus Became God: The Exaltation of a Jewish Preacher from Galilee. He is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and is the author of more than twenty books, many of which are listed below. He has Continue reading

May 23, 2014 – On Plato

My guest on this program is Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, author most recently of Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won’t Go Away. She received her doctorate in philosophy from Princeton University, and has written many award-winning books. She has received a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, has been designated a Humanist of the Continue reading

May 9, 2014 – Jesus of Nazareth

My guest on this program is Reza Aslan, the author of the bestselling books No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam and most recently Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth. He is an associate professor of creative writing at the University of California and a research associate at the University of Southern California’s Center on Public Diplomacy. He holds a Master of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School and a Ph.D. in the history of religion from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

April 25, 2014 – A Natural History of Thinking

This program features a conversation with Michael Tomasello, author of Origins of Human Communication, and most recently, A Natural History of Human Thinking. He is Co-Director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany.

April 11, 2014 – The Science of the Alimentary Canal

Mary Roach is the author of five books, and has written for Wired, National Geographic, and the New York Times Magazine, among others. Her most recent book is Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal, which like all her books is as much about human beings as it is human bodies.

Previous books
Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers
Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife
Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void
Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex

March 28, 2014 – Teenage Psychology

On this program I have a conversation with Daniel J. Siegel, M.D., internationally acclaimed author, award-winning educator, and child psychiatrist. We’ll be talking primarily about his recent book, Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain. He is currently a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine where he also serves as a co-investigator at the Center for Culture, Brain, and Development and co-director of the Mindful Awareness Research Center. He is also the Executive Director Continue reading

March 14, 2014 – Prisons & Racialization

My guest on this program is Steve Martinot, author of The Machinery of Whiteness: Studies in the Structure of Racialization, and “The Need to Abolish the Prison System: An Ethical Indictment.” He has been a human rights activist for most of his life, as a union organizer, community organizer and anti-war organizer, including Latin America solidarity work. He has worked as a machinist and truck driver, and taught literature and cultural studies at the Univ. of Colorado and San Francisco State University.

February 28, 2014 – S. Lochlann Jain

My guest on this program is S. Lochlann Jain, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University, and author of Malignant: How Cancer Becomes Us, in which she aims to better understand American life and culture through cancer. Nearly half of all Americans will be diagnosed in their lifetimes with an invasive cancer, making it an all-too common component of American Life. And yet, despite billions of dollars having been spent in search of a cure, it remains a pervasive threat.