May 27, 2016 – American Amnesia and Prosperity

My guest on this program is Paul Pierson. He is the John Gross Professor of Political Science at the University of California at Berkeley, and co-author with Jacob Hacker of American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper.They explore how America’s prosperity has long rested on robust capitalist enterprise, supported, supplemented, and regulated by government. This “mixed economy” channeled the powerful but volatile engine of capitalism into broad-based growth and healthy social development. But the anti-government advocates have undermined this productive and necessary relationship.

May 13, 2016 – Listen, Liberal! with Thomas Frank

My guest on this program is Thomas Frank, author of numerous books, including The Wrecking Crew, What’s the Matter with Kansas? and Pity the Billionaire about which he appeared on this program in September of 2012. He is the founding editor of The Baffler, and has written for other publications. He joins us today to talk about his new book, Listen, Liberal – or – What Ever Happened to the Party of the People?

 

April 29, 2016 – Why Grow Up?

My guest on this program is philosopher Susan Neiman author of Why Grow Up? Subversive Thoughts for an Infantile Age. Drawing on thinkers such as Kant, Rousseau and Arendt, she shows that genuine adulthood, not permanent youth, is a subversive ideal worth striving for. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard, and was a professor at both Yale and Tel Aviv University. She is currently the director of the Einstein Forum in Potsdam, which presents innovative, international and multidisciplinary thinkers to the public in conferences, workshops, panel discussion, and presentations.

April 15, 2016 – An Expert on Expertise

My guest on this program is Anders Ericsson, a Conradi Eminent Scholar and professor of psychology at Florida State University. Considered the world’s reigning expert on expertise, inventor of the 10,000-hour rule, and an expert on the field of professional development, his recent book, Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise, provides a new look at how we can all step up our game and become experts in our fields.

April 1, 2016 – Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus

My guest on this program is bestselling author of over a dozen books Douglas Rushkoff. Named one of the world’s ten most influential thinkers by MIT, he has made documentaries for PBS Frontline, and he is a professor of media theory and digital economics at Queens College, City University of New York. We had him on the program about 2 ½ years ago with his book, Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now. He’s back this time with Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus: How Growth Became the Enemy of Prosperity.

March 18, 2016 – The Fight to Vote

My guest on this program is Michael Waldman, president of the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, a nonpartisan law and policy institute that works to improve the systems of democracy and justice. He was director of speechwriting for President Bill Clinton from 1995 to 1999 and has authored several books, including The Second Amendment, My Fellow Americans, and POTUS Speaks. His most recent book is The Fight to Vote, which takes a succinct and comprehensive look at a crucial American Continue reading

March 4, 2016 – The Way Forward

My guest on this program is social critic Curtis White, and author of the acclaimed The Science Delusion: Asking the Big Questions in a Culture of Easy Answers, and the bestselling The Middle Mind: Why Americans Don’t Think for Themselves. His most recent book is We, Robots: Staying Human in the Age of Big Data, which takes up the question, “Can technology really solve all of our problems?” to which he answers essentially, “No.” He offers us an insightful and incisive look into what it will take to alter course.

February 19, 2016 – Philosophy in The New York Times

My guests on this program are Peter Catapano and Simon Critchley, editors of The Stone Reader: Modern Philosophy in 133 Arguments. The book is derived from the popular New York Times philosophy series, The Stone, first launched online in 2010. It has attracted millions of readers through its accessible examination of universal topics like the nature of science, consciousness and morality, while also probing more contemporary issues such as the morality of drones, gun control and the gender divide. Peter Catapano has been an editor at The New York Times since 2005. Simon Critchley is a best-selling author and the Hans Jonas Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research.

January 22, 2016 – How Do We Establish A Purposeful Life?

My guest on this program is Baylor University Associate Professor of Sociology, Paul Froese, author most recently of On Purpose: How We Create the Meaning of Life. Professor Froese is also the Director of the Baylor Religion Surveys, and co-author of America’s Four Gods: What We Way about God—and What That Says about Us. The current book, On Purpose: How We Create the Meaning of Life, mixes data and analysis with literary and historical examples to show not that life has some ultimate meaning or no meaning at all, but rather that creating a purpose-driven life has always been a collective project.

November 6, 2015 – Faith versus Fact

My guest today is Jerry Coyne, professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at the University of Chicago, where he specializes in evolutionary genetics. New York Times bestselling author, his most recent book is Faith vs. Fact: Why Science and Religion Are Incompatible, In which he asserts that religion and science are not complementary, but rather compete with each other to understand the realities of our universe, but that only one area—science—has the means to actually discover the truth.