August 18, 2017 – The Story of American Utopianism

My guest on this program is writer Chris Jennings, author of Paradise Now: The Story of American Utopianism, which tells the story of five interrelated utopian movements following the Enlightenment, revealing their relevance to both their time and our own

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August 4, 2017 – The Fulfillment of Human Life (archive broadcast)

This was an archive re-broadcast of a program that originally aired on August 31, 2012.

My guest on this edition of Consider This is Kenneth Anbender, Ph.D. Dr. Anbender founded Contegrity in 1992 with Gail Cantor and he specializes in the design of programs that orient people to the place of communication, development, and accomplishment in building a fulfilling life. His work is both transformative and developmental in nature. He holds a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology (1975) from Adelphi University Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies. Since that time, he has been a trainer, curriculum designer and business consultant who has personally developed over 100,000 people in public Continue reading

July 21, 2017 – Moral Failure & Moral Dilemmas

My guest on this program is Lisa Tessman, professor of philosophy at Binghampton University. She teaches and does research in ethics, moral psychology, feminist philosophy, and related areas. Her work focuses on understanding how real human beings construct morality and experience moral demands, especially under difficult conditions. She is the author of Moral Failure: On the Impossible Demands of Morality, and most recently When Doing the Right Thing is Impossible, in which she provides examples, both real and fictional, of situations that will make us wonder whether we can be required to do the impossible, and how and why human beings have constructed moral requirements to be binding even when they are impossible to fulfill.

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July 7, 2017 – The Knowledge Illusion

My guest on this program is professor of cognitive, linguistic, and psychological sciences at Brown University, Steven Sloman. He is the editor in chief of the journal Cognition, and his recent book is The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone. In this book, he and his co-author Philip Fernbach, argue that intelligence and knowledge are fundamentally communal in nature, and despite how well we might be individually educated, none of us is as smart as we think we are.

June 23, 2017 – Slow Philosophy

My guest on this program is Michelle Boulous Walker, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Queensland, Australia. Dr. Walker’s research interests span the fields of European philosophy, aesthetics, ethics, and feminist philosophy. Her teaching interests in philosophy include intersections with politics, film, and literature. Her most recent book is Slow Philosophy: Reading against the Institution, in which she argues that philosophy involves the patient work of thought; in this it resembles the work of art, which invites and implores us to take our time and to engage with the world. At its best, philosophy teaches us to read slowly; in fact, philosophy is the art of reading slowly – and this inevitably clashes with many of our current institutional practices and demands. Continue reading

April 28, 2017 – Memory and The Self

This program features University of Miami philosopher Mark Rowlands. He is the author of eighteen books, and over a hundred journal articles, chapters and reviews, and his work has been translated into more than twenty languages. His memoir, The Philosopher and the Wolf, became an international bestseller. His most recent book is Memory and the Self: Phenomenology, Science and Autobiography, in which he explores the role of memory in maintaining a sense of personal identity over time.

March 31, 2017 – Anger and Forgiveness

My guest on this program is Martha Nussbaum, Ernst Freund Distinguished Professor of Law and Ethics, appointed in the Law School and the Philosophy Department at the University of Chicago. She is the author of many books, and was recently named the 2017 Jefferson Lecturer in the Humanities, the highest honor the federal government bestows for distinguished intellectual achievement in the humanities. Her most recent book is Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice, in which she analyzes the roots of both anger, finding it conceptually confused and normatively pernicious, and forgiveness, as potentially the best way to respond to injury, shedding new light on both.

March 17, 2017 – Universal Basic Income

My guest on this program is Andy Stern former head of the nation’s most influential and fastest-growing union, the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), and author of Raising the Floor: How a Universal Basic Income Can Renew Our Economy and Rebuild the American DreamHe argues that a basic income can create a floor high enough to end poverty, and respond to how technological disruption is replacing more and more jobs in this unprecedented economic climate.

 

Andy recommended during the show that for more information go here:
Economic Security Project

February 17, 2017 – Utopia Is Creepy

My guest on this program is Nicholas Carr, author of The Shallows, a Pulitzer Prize finalist, and the Glass Cage, among other books. Former executive editor of the Harvard Business Review, he has written for The Atlantic, the New York Times, and Wired. His most recent book is Utopia is Creepy and Other Provocations, which gathers a decade’s worth of posts from his blog, Rough Type, as well as his seminal essays. It offers an alternative history of the digital age, chronicling its roller-coaster crazes and crashes, its blind triumphs, and its unintended consequences.

As a follow up to this on-air conversation, Mark Zuckerberg made an announcement the day before. Here are links to an NPR story about it, Nicholas Carr’s Rough Type blog post response, and the original text of Zuckerberg’s announcement:

Facebook wants Great Power, But What About Responsibility?
Zuckerberg’s World by Nicholas Carr
Building Global Community by Mark Zuckerberg