October 28, 2016 – What Is the Mind?

My returning guest on this program is noted neuropsychiatrist and New York Times best-selling author Dr. Daniel Siegel. His new book is Mind: A Journey to the Heart of Being Human, in which he offers a definition of mind that illuminates how, what, when, where, and even the why of who we are, of what mind is, and what the mind’s self has the potential to become.

September 16, 2016 – Inevitable Technological Forces

My returning guest on this program is Wired magazine senior maverick Kevin Kelly. Author of numerous books, and writer for such publications as The New York Times, The Economist, Science, Time, and the Wall Street Journal, his most recent book is The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces that Will Shape Our Future, in which he argues that much of what will happen in the next thirty years is inevitable, driven by technological trends that are already in motion, and that will revolutionize the way we buy, work, learn, and communicate with each other.

May 27, 2016 – American Amnesia and Prosperity

My guest on this program is Paul Pierson. He is the John Gross Professor of Political Science at the University of California at Berkeley, and co-author with Jacob Hacker of American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper.They explore how America’s prosperity has long rested on robust capitalist enterprise, supported, supplemented, and regulated by government. This “mixed economy” channeled the powerful but volatile engine of capitalism into broad-based growth and healthy social development. But the anti-government advocates have undermined this productive and necessary relationship.

May 13, 2016 – Listen, Liberal! with Thomas Frank

My guest on this program is Thomas Frank, author of numerous books, including The Wrecking Crew, What’s the Matter with Kansas? and Pity the Billionaire about which he appeared on this program in September of 2012. He is the founding editor of The Baffler, and has written for other publications. He joins us today to talk about his new book, Listen, Liberal – or – What Ever Happened to the Party of the People?

 

April 29, 2016 – Why Grow Up?

My guest on this program is philosopher Susan Neiman author of Why Grow Up? Subversive Thoughts for an Infantile Age. Drawing on thinkers such as Kant, Rousseau and Arendt, she shows that genuine adulthood, not permanent youth, is a subversive ideal worth striving for. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard, and was a professor at both Yale and Tel Aviv University. She is currently the director of the Einstein Forum in Potsdam, which presents innovative, international and multidisciplinary thinkers to the public in conferences, workshops, panel discussion, and presentations.

April 15, 2016 – An Expert on Expertise

My guest on this program is Anders Ericsson, a Conradi Eminent Scholar and professor of psychology at Florida State University. Considered the world’s reigning expert on expertise, inventor of the 10,000-hour rule, and an expert on the field of professional development, his recent book, Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise, provides a new look at how we can all step up our game and become experts in our fields.

March 18, 2016 – The Fight to Vote

My guest on this program is Michael Waldman, president of the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, a nonpartisan law and policy institute that works to improve the systems of democracy and justice. He was director of speechwriting for President Bill Clinton from 1995 to 1999 and has authored several books, including The Second Amendment, My Fellow Americans, and POTUS Speaks. His most recent book is The Fight to Vote, which takes a succinct and comprehensive look at a crucial American Continue reading

February 19, 2016 – Philosophy in The New York Times

My guests on this program are Peter Catapano and Simon Critchley, editors of The Stone Reader: Modern Philosophy in 133 Arguments. The book is derived from the popular New York Times philosophy series, The Stone, first launched online in 2010. It has attracted millions of readers through its accessible examination of universal topics like the nature of science, consciousness and morality, while also probing more contemporary issues such as the morality of drones, gun control and the gender divide. Peter Catapano has been an editor at The New York Times since 2005. Simon Critchley is a best-selling author and the Hans Jonas Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research.

October 9, 2015 – Who Is In Charge of America’s Schools?

My guest on this program is journalist Dale Russakoff, author of The Prize, Who’s in Charge of America’s Schools, in which she delivers a riveting drama of our times, encompassing the rise of celebrity politics, big philanthropy, extreme economic inequality, the charter school movement, and the struggles and triumphs of schools in one of the nation’s poorest cities.

July 3, 2015 – History of Black Holes

My guest on this program is Marcia Bartusiak, Professor of the Practice, Graduate Program in Science Writing, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the award-winning author of five previous books. We’ll be talking about her most recent, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled on by Hawking Became Loved. It examines the history of an idea, and tells the story of the fierce black Continue reading