February 3, 2017 – Philosophy on the Right

My guest on this program is Sir Roger Scruton, a writer (who has published over 40 books), conservative philosopher at the University of Buchingham, and a Fellow of the British Academy, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and a Senior Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington D.C. We’ll be talking about his recent book, Fools, Frauds and Firebrands: Thinkers of the New Left, in which he examines the fact of a preponderance of humanities academics who are on the left, and challenges the arguments they make for their authority. We’ll also be considering some of the themes in Confessions of a Heretic: Selected Essays, which is due out in America on March 28th.

October 14, 2016 – The Wisdom of Frugality & Simple Living

My guest on this program is Professor Emrys Westacott, author most recently of The Wisdom of Frugality: Why Less Is More—More or Less. The book examines why, for more than two millennia, so many philosophers and people with a reputation for wisdom have been advocating frugality and simple living as the key to a good life. They have been mostly ignored, but he argues that in a world facing environmental crisis, it may finally be time to listen to the advocates of a simpler way of life.

July 22, 2016 – Being a Good Neighbor

My guest on this program is Harvard University Professor of Ethics in Politics and Government Nancy Rosenblum. Her most recent book is Good Neighbors: The Democracy of Everyday Life in America, in which she explores how our relationships with our neighbors—meeting on the street, monitoring one another, and even betraying each other—create a democracy of everyday life that is somewhat removed from the moral principles prescribed for public, and more universalized, civil society and democratic life.

July 8, 2016 – Living in the World Beyond Your Head

My guest on this program is Matthew Crawford, senior fellow at the University of Virginia’s Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture. We’ll be talking today about his book, The World Beyond Your Head: On Becoming an Individual in an Age of Distraction, which was recently released in paperback, in which he investigates the challenge of mastering one’s own mind. He argues that our current crisis of attention cannot exclusively be attributed to digital technology, but can be better understood in light of some Western cultural assumptions that are profoundly at odds with human nature.

May 27, 2016 – American Amnesia and Prosperity

My guest on this program is Paul Pierson. He is the John Gross Professor of Political Science at the University of California at Berkeley, and co-author with Jacob Hacker of American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper.They explore how America’s prosperity has long rested on robust capitalist enterprise, supported, supplemented, and regulated by government. This “mixed economy” channeled the powerful but volatile engine of capitalism into broad-based growth and healthy social development. But the anti-government advocates have undermined this productive and necessary relationship.

April 29, 2016 – Why Grow Up?

My guest on this program is philosopher Susan Neiman author of Why Grow Up? Subversive Thoughts for an Infantile Age. Drawing on thinkers such as Kant, Rousseau and Arendt, she shows that genuine adulthood, not permanent youth, is a subversive ideal worth striving for. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard, and was a professor at both Yale and Tel Aviv University. She is currently the director of the Einstein Forum in Potsdam, which presents innovative, international and multidisciplinary thinkers to the public in conferences, workshops, panel discussion, and presentations.

March 18, 2016 – The Fight to Vote

My guest on this program is Michael Waldman, president of the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, a nonpartisan law and policy institute that works to improve the systems of democracy and justice. He was director of speechwriting for President Bill Clinton from 1995 to 1999 and has authored several books, including The Second Amendment, My Fellow Americans, and POTUS Speaks. His most recent book is The Fight to Vote, which takes a succinct and comprehensive look at a crucial American Continue reading

March 4, 2016 – The Way Forward

My guest on this program is social critic Curtis White, and author of the acclaimed The Science Delusion: Asking the Big Questions in a Culture of Easy Answers, and the bestselling The Middle Mind: Why Americans Don’t Think for Themselves. His most recent book is We, Robots: Staying Human in the Age of Big Data, which takes up the question, “Can technology really solve all of our problems?” to which he answers essentially, “No.” He offers us an insightful and incisive look into what it will take to alter course.

September 25, 2015 – The Politics of Openness

My guest on this program is Nathaniel Tkacz, author of Wikipedia and the Politics of Openness. Few virtues are as celebrated in contemporary culture as openness. But what does openness mean, and what would a political theory of openness look like? On this program, we will analyze the theory and politics of openness in practice–and break its spell.

September 11, 2015 – Ecology, Ethics, and the Future of Humanity

My guest on this program is philosopher and environmental & human rights activist Adam Riggio. In his book, Ecology, Ethics, and the Future of Humanity, he argues that climate change and the ecological destruction it entails requires a complete reorientation of morality, politics, and human identity along ecological lines. Bringing together concepts from environmental activism, moral philosophy, biological and ecological sciences, and Continue reading